Friday, April 20, 2012

Homosexuality, Part 1 of 2: Just the Facts

Sexually Transmitted Diseases  You knew about HIV/AIDS, of course, but homosexuals and lesbians are also more at risk than hererosexuals for all sorts of STDs, not only the usual (Gonorrhea, Chlamydia, Syphilis, etc.), but also for some for which there is no cure: Hepatitus A, B, or C, and for men, anal Human Papilloma Virus. In the case of Hepatitus C, there not only is no cure, but also no vaccine. For lesbians, “Bacterial vaginosis, cerebral vascular disease, polycystic ovaries, and androgehypernism were higher in lesbians than heterosexual women.” (From several web sites, including here.)

Substance Abuse  Substance abuse is much higher among homosexuals and lesbians than in the general population. In one study, fifty percent of gays admit to illicit drug use. 

One report tells us, “Recent studies seem to support the notion that gay men use tobacco at much higher rates than straight men, reaching nearly 50 percent in several studies. Tobacco-related health problems include lung disease and lung cancer, heart disease, high blood pressure, and a whole host of other serious problems.” The CDC says, “Current evidence suggests that gay and bisexual men are more likely to smoke (33.2%) than men in the general population (21.3%), and lesbians are more likely to smoke (25%) than heterosexual women (15%). 

Both homosexual men and lesbians also tend to drink more than straight men and women. Drinking too much is also a risk factor, in all women, for osteoporosis.

Cancers  Homosexual men appear to have higher rates of prostate, testicular, and colon cancer

Lesbians have “the richest concentration of risk factors for breast cancer than any subset of women in the world.”  Two of these factors are thought to be not having babies and not nursing babies

Lesbians also have higher rates of gynecologic cancers than straight women

Mental Health Issues

Among homosexual men, there is a much higher rate of anorexia and bulimia than among straight men; and among both men and women there is an even higher rate of obesity than in the general population. Obesity is implicated in a host of other ailments like diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, and breast cancer

Gays of both sexes show a much higher than usual rate of depression and anxiety. This is often blamed upon non-acceptance by “homophobes”, but the correlation between sexual orientation and mental health remains strong even in societies where homosexuality is well-accepted, such as the Netherlands. 

The rate of suicides (successful) among gay men in partnerships is eight times that of heterosexual men. Lesbian women in partnerships are 65% more likely to kill themselves than straight women.

Molestation and violence have been "found to be disproportionately higher in the homosexual subgroup.” 

The "Born that Way" Theory   Same sex attraction sometimes feels, subjectively, as though it had been present in the person from birth, but in fact, although our genes are involved in some way in every single thing about us, there is no credible evidence that they play anything but a minor role in homosexuality. Here is a list of more than dozen studies refuting the “born that way” theory.  

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Where, one may ask, did I find all this material? On some hateful, bigoted website? No.  Some details are from a site considered controversial because it also offers psychotherapy for unwanted homosexuality.  But much of this material comes from the Gay and Lesbian Medical Association.  You can also find all of these topics dealt with by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, here.  The Food and Drug Administration also discusses some of these in its explanation of why it doesn't want men who have sex with other men to donate blood; read it here

These are simply facts.

In a forthcoming post, I will discuss some conclusions and what a Christian stance toward homosexuality ought to be.

3 comments:

Weekend Fisher said...

Wow, I've been thinking a lot about how mental health affects physical health. It's not just my friend with the girl scout cookies and the weight-related problems, but other people too. It seems like everywhere I look, someone is struggling with a mental health problem that drags them down physically as well.

Lord, have mercy.

Anastasia Theodoridis said...

For sure. Lots and lots and lots of people have depression and other mental health-related issues.

(And we don't fire them from their jobs just upon learning their diagnoses; if they can do they job, we keep them on.)

Anastasia Theodoridis said...

Make that "their" job...