Sunday, December 9, 2007

Isaiah 53, Septuagint

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The Septuagint is the Greek translation of the Hebrew Scriptures made by Jewish scholars, and was the standard Jewish Bible until the advent of Christianity. It is the version known to and quoted by Christ and the apostles. In the Greek, it is therefore the most authoritative translation of the Old Testament. And its idea of what the Hebrew means is rather different from what the King James scholars thought, especially in verses 10 and 11. Here's an English rendering of this beautiful prophecy.

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O Lord, who has believed our report? and to whom has the arm of the Lord been revealed? 2 We brought a report as of a child before him; he is as a root in a thirsty land: he has no form nor comeliness; and we saw him, but he had no form nor beauty. 3 But his form was ignoble, and inferior to that of the children of men; he was a man in suffering, and acquainted with the bearing of sickness, for his face is turned from us: he was dishonoured, and not esteemed.

4 He bears our sins, and is pained for us: yet we accounted him to be in trouble, and in suffering, and in affliction. 5 But he was wounded on account of our sins, and was bruised because of our iniquities: the chastisement of our peace was upon him; and by his bruises we were healed. 6 All we as sheep have gone astray; every one has gone astray in his way; and the Lord gave him up for our sins. 7 And he, because of his affliction, opens not his mouth: he was led as a sheep to the slaughter, and as a lamb before the shearer is dumb, so he opens not his mouth. 8 In his humiliation his judgment was taken away: who shall declare his generation? for his life is taken away from the earth: because of the iniquities of my people he was led to death. 9 And I will give the wicked for his burial, and the rich for his death; for he practised no iniquity, nor craft with his mouth.

10 The Lord also is pleased to purge him from his stroke. If ye give an offering for sin, your soul shall see a long-lived seed: 11 the Lord also is pleased to take away from the travail of his soul, to shew him light, and to form him with understanding; to justify the just one who serves many well; and he shall bear their sins. 12 Therefore he shall inherit many, and he shall divide the spoils of the mighty; because his soul was delivered to death: and he was numbered among the transgressors; and he bore the sins of many, and was delivered because of their iniquities.

2 comments:

Anders said...

Le-havdil,
The first century historical pro-Torah Pharisee Ribi Yehoshua ha-Mashiakh (the Messiah) is the person that Yeshayahu 53 is about. Read a translation according to etymology and comments (“What all of the earliest extant Judaic mss. Say; No Nonsense, No-Agenda, No-Holds-Barred, Deal-with-it, Historical Translation) of every pasuq (“verse”) of Yeshayahu 53 in the above website (History Museum (left panel); Mashiakh (top panel); “Mâshiakh of Tana"kh Subverts Tana"kh to be the Mâshiakh?” )

A logical analysis (found in www.netzarim.co.il (Netzarim.co.il is the website of the only legitimate Netzarim-group)) (including the logical implications of the research by Ben-Gurion Univ. Prof. of Linguistics Elisha Qimron of Dead Sea Scroll 4Q MMT) of all extant source documents of “the gospel of Matthew” and archeology proves that the historical Ribi Yehosuha ha-Mashiakh (the Messiah) from Nazareth and his talmidim (apprentice-students), called the Netzarim, taught and lived Torah all of their lives; and that Netzarim and Christianity were always antithetical.

This implies that the historical Ribi Yehoshua ha-Mashiakh of Nazareth is not the same as the Christian J….
Anders Branderud

Anastasia Theodoridis said...

I am aware that Jews and Christians do not have the same interpretation of this passage.

This translation was the accepted one by everyone, including the rabbis, for centuries - until the Christian era.